Bios

Gerald Markowitz is Distinguished Professor of History at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He received his doctorate from the Department of History of the University of Wisconsin. He is the recipient of numerous grants from private and federal agencies, including the Milbank Memorial Fund, National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Science Foundation. He has been awarded the Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Work in the History of the Public Health from the American Public Health Association in 2000. Together with David Rosner he has authored and edited books and articles on occupational safety and health, including Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Disease in Twentieth Century America (Princeton University Press, 2002), Dying for Work (Indiana University Press, 1987), and "Slaves of the Depression": Workers' Letters about Life on the Job (Cornell University Press, 1987), “The Reawakening of National Concern about Silicosis,” (with D. Rosner), Public Health Reports 113 (July/August 1998), 302-311,“Workers, Industry, and the Control of Information: Silicosis and the Industrial Hygiene Foundation,” (with D. Rosner), Journal of Public Health Policy, 16(Spring, 1995), 29-58, “The Limits of Thresholds, Silica and the Politics of Science, 1935-1990,” (with D. Rosner) American Journal of Public Health, 85 (February, 1995), 253-262. He and David Rosner have recently authored Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution (University of California Press and Milbank Memorial Fund, 2002). E-mail: gmarkowitz@jjay.cuny.edu

David Rosner is Professor of History and Public Health at Columbia University and Director of the Center for the History of Public Health at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health. He and Gerald Markowitz have recently authored Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution , (University of California Press and the Milbank Memorial Fund, 2002).He received his BA from City College of New York, MPH from the University of Massachusetts and his doctorate from Harvard in the History of Science. Before moving to Columbia in 1998 he was University Distinguished Professor of History at the City University of New York. In addition to numerous grants, he has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow and a Josiah Macy Fellow. Presently, he is the recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Investigator Award. He has been awarded the Distinguished Scholar’s Prize from the City University and recently, the Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Work in the History of Public Health from the APHA and the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Massachusetts. He is author of A Once Charitable Enterprise (Cambridge University Press, 1982; Princeton University Press, 1987), and editor of “Hives of Sickness,” Epidemics and Public Health in New York City (Rutgers University Press, 1995) and Health Care in America: Essays in Social History (with Susan Reverby). In addition, he has co-authored and edited with Gerald Markowitz numerous books and articles, including Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Disease in Twentieth Century America , (Princeton University Press, 1991;1994), Children, Race, and Power: Kenneth and Mamie Clarks’ Northside Center, (University Press of Virginia, 1996; Routledge, 2000); Dying for Work, (Indiana University Press, 1987) and “Slaves of the Depression:” Workers’ Letters About Life on the Job, (Cornell University Press, 1987). E-mail: dr289@columbia.edu